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20121101
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announced she is not going to campaign in 2012 for barack obama. >> host: the role of jesse jackson in president president s early political career. >> guest: that's very up known. i was very fortunate in being able to find about that. jesse jackson is still a highly regarded figure in the african-american community in chicago. and when obama started running for the u.s. senate, he was advised to go to jackson and get some help from jackson regarding foreign policy issues, domestic policy issues, but even more important, his speaking -- his oratory needed some work and they thought jesse could help him. and jackson agreed to do so. and every saturday for a whole year, barack obama was invited to the push rainbow meeting that jackson held, where jackson worked with obama on his oratory and his delivery of speeches, and he improved tremendously. guess what? since he was elected president, president barack obama has not invited jesse jackson to the white house once. he is totally, completely cut himself off from jesse jackson. no one seems to know exactly why, except that it appears th
that. it is andrew jackson. and first of all, how often did you look for the little story at the beginning that -- frankly, a lot of them i never heard. >> if you didn't hear of them i'm very impressed. we did. and i cap say that i was the one personally going through the archives and doing it. it was one of the decisions i made to try to make it as non historical as possible, to make it as journalistic as possible. and it is -- device we use in journalism to find the little nugget, the little anecdote that gives -- reveals something about the guy's character. it is a device you use in journalism, lead little. lead with some little wonderful nugget, anecdote, that gives you an insight ask draws the reader in. and we begin in the case of andrew jackson with a story of him in a duel, dean fending his wife's honor at which he had to do a number of times. before he -- went to the presidency. >> you say -- the fellow's name is charles dickinson who was 27 years old and had already killed 26 people in duels. who is his opponent if >> andrew jackson. >> what was -- what was the r
, and you could always get a picture with him. and there were others. jesse jackson's a terrific subject, and some of the others. we had a lot of fun along the way. and others, of course, are more difficult. >> who is the most difficult? >> well, pat robertson wasn't the easiest person in the world to photograph. and i think the reason for that is simple. he's a gentleman who makes his living on television, and is very aware of the camera, and very aware of camera angles, and how he looks. and therefore, he has his guard up at all times. and when you look at pictures of him in the book, you can see that. he just notices where the camera is all the time because he's been trained, and that's how he makes a living. that's his profession. where the other candidates don't come from television. >> one thing inside this book on the flap that seems a little higher than most, and that's the price. how much does it cost for this? and i don't mean higher than most photographic books, i mean higher than most books. how much is this on the news stand? >> the soft cover -- you've got the hard cover. m
blow to the confederacy. coming almost a year to the day after stone wall jackson's death. when he was president, grant once told the congressman that sheraton had no superior as a general living or dead and possibly know call. sheraton said grant was capable more than general ship he could manage a territory as lang as any two nations can cover in a war. but sheraton would never have risen so high nor have citiesover counties named after him without creeder creek. the circle in washington depicts sheraton of the touring war house. in the act of realing his army at -- and no command the new army of the shenandoah. sheraton's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5", and only 115 pounds in 1864. but it's grant memorable replied to one officer who commented on sheraton diminutive statute, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheraton's appointment, confederate general and 14,000 troops had marched down the shenandoah valley across the plateau mick to washington. it was a shock. capital was thrown to a panic. grant r
to the day after stonewall jackson's death. grant's confidence in sheridan was reported by sheridan's battlefield victories and his impressive postwar achievements. when he was president, grant once told the congressmen that sheridan had no superior as a general, living or dead, and possibly no equal. sheridan, said grant, was capable more than generalship. he could manage a territory as large as any two nations can cover any war. but sheridan was never written so high nor would have cities and counties named after him without cedar creek. a statue in sheridan circle in washington depicts sheridan on his towering warhorse in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's d
jackson series, read: time. at the end of the summer, jack was a bright guy, but was not a big reader and a good-looking kid -- his mother must be very, very pretty. but by the end of the summer, he had read a dozen books. about nine of them he liked a lot in his reading skills have gone to remove. so he went from eight yourself or he didn't like to read two when he took his sats, which they take, he got 800 reading, which is the highest score you can get. so that's what can happen. it's unimportant whether they get 800 or harvard or vanderbilt , the support they get through high school and they have options when they get out. so yeah, mitch, where are you? , now, we're going to shoot the breeze and awesome question. what happened with that movie, et cetera, et cetera. [applause] >> so i think you can also why we have a master storyteller a mischievous measure in the story that he tells. i think we need to create on this throughout the country. we read in our house. i think that is one of the most brilliant taglines that i've heard in a long, long time. don't you agree? i think we sho
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6